Safety issues require careful management to reduce and avoid accidents, illness, and injury in the workplace. Safety problems cost money and affect an employer’s reputation in the communities and industries in which they operate. Regular safety meetings are one aspect of safety management that has an impact on safety outcomes, and OSHA has many resources for safety meetings.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration reports that direct workers’ compensation costs in 2008 for the most disabling work injuries totaled more than $50 billion. Strong safety and health programs add bottom-line value and provide a measurable return on investment. Goldman Sachs JBWere Group reports that companies that don’t manage workplace safety don’t perform as well financially as those that do. Implementing and coordinating safety programs is often the responsibility of administrative staff who meet regularly in safety meetings to manage safety issues, policies, and programs. OSHA is a qualified source of ideas for safety meetings.

How Safety Saves Money
Present information about how safety saves money as a meeting opener or kickoff or as an awareness message to close a safety meeting. On OSHA’s “Making the Business Case for Safety and Health” webpage, OSHA reports that work-related injuries cost billions of dollars in 2008, investment in safety improvements and training saves worker’s compensation costs and attention to ergonomics results in reduced injuries. Information about how other companies are saving money with safety practices helps convince managers and owners of the value of safety efforts to their business.

Review Business Safety Success
Present information about how safety saves money as a meeting opener or kickoff or as an awareness message to close a safety meeting. On OSHA’s “Making the Business Case for Safety and Health” webpage, OSHA reports that work-related injuries cost billions of dollars in 2008, investment in safety improvements and training saves worker’s compensation costs and attention to ergonomics results in reduced injuries. Information about how other companies are saving money with safety practices helps convince managers and owners of the value of safety efforts to their business.

Review OSHA Requirements
A good safety meeting topic is a quick review of OSHA requirements when a worker has job-related illness or injury. Frequent refreshers of OSHA compliance requirements helps staff in safety meetings learn and remember safety rules and regulations. Review of compliance requirements helps guide safety practices and helps employees retain safety awareness information.

Workplace Violence
Remind staff involved in safety administration that workplace violence is a safety issue. OSHA’s General Duty Clause requires employers to provide a safe and healthy workplace, including taking reasonable action to prevent recognized violence hazards.

Teens are More At Risk Than Adults
Discuss how teens and young workers are more at risk on the job because of workplace inexperience and developmental differences to raise awareness at safety meetings of the need for special attention to this employee group. Present OSHA’s information about teen workers, including teen worker rights and responsibilities, true stories about teen work-related injuries and fatalities and teen workers brochures and posters.

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